Rubrics until 2013

Rubric for Outcome a:
An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics,science, and engineering
Given an engineering problem to solve or principle to analyze within the course material, the student is capable of applying mathematics and science fundamentals (this rubrics describes the level of achievement attained in applying fundamentals and detailed analysis)
1The student solves given mathematical equations.
2The student formulates the equations appropriate for the problem.
3The student formulates and solves the equations appropriate for the problem.
4Besides reaching level 3, either probability/statistics analysis or economical evaluation is applied to a given engineering problem.
5Besides reaching level 3, both probability/statistics analysis and economical evaluation are applied to a given engineering problem.
Rubric for Outcome b:
An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
Students can analyze and interpret results from measurements or simulations:
1Given by the professor.
2By following instructions to perform an experiment.
3By following instructions to perform an experiment. They can calibrate, configure, and test the instruments to conduct the laboratory work.
4By designing an experiment. Implementation is not required.
5By designing and conducting an experiment.
Rubric for Outcome c:
An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability
Given a design problem related to the student's area of study, logical and orderly design procedures are followed which:
1Following a given design technique, partially satisfy the problem specifications.
2Following a given design technique, correctly complete a design.
3Meets a set of realistic specifications. The design approach is chosen by the student.
4Meets a set of realistic specifications, clearly documenting the decision-making process.
5Meets a set of realistic specifications, clearly documenting the decision-making process. The design should also consider at least two realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, policies and legal, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability
Rubric for Outcome d:
An ability to function on multidisciplinary teams
Given an engineering problem to be solved by a team of students:
1The team solves a simple problem cooperatively.
2The team shows an ability to subdivide a complex problem in parts.
3The team shows an ability to subdivide a complex problem in parts, assign responsibilities, and combine peer work into the solution.
4In addition to 3, the team shows a clear leadership, task distribution and verification, progress review and conflict resolution processes and shows interaction with people from diverse disciplines
5In addition to 4 the team identifies and seeks out people with relevant expertise.
Rubric for Outcome e:
An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
Given an engineering problem that might not be completely defined:
1Students are able to propose a plausible solution to a previously formulated problem.
2Students are able to propose a plausible solution and solve a previously formulated problem.
3Students can formulate the problem, specify the performance requirements, and propose a plausible solution.
4In addition to 3, the students solve the problem.
5In addition to 4, the students initially identify the problem and justify their choice of solution.
Rubric for Outcome f:
An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
1Given an ethical problem, students can informally analyze the situation.
2Students are aware of applicable codes of ethics, such as those of CIAPR, IEEE or ACM.
3Given an ethical problem, students can use applicable codes of ethics, such as those of CIAPR, IEEE or ACM in the analysis of the situation.
4Given an ethical problem, students analyze the ethical situation using applicable codes of ethics and the formal ethical criteria (e.g., least harm, reversibility, and publicity).
5Students can identify a compromising ethical situation, and analyze it using applicable codes of ethics and formal ethical criteria (e.g., least harm, reversibility, and publicity).
Rubric for Outcome g:
An ability to communicate effectively
Students are able to communicate graphically using schematics, tables, graphics or mathematical equations:
1In a simple context, such as assignments and tests.
2In a simple context, such as assignments, laboratory reports and tests. The student, also communicate their ideas in a writing composition.
3In a medium context, such as short reports.
4In moderately complex context, such as a project report or a well organized public presentation. Their work presents any necessary technical documentation.
5In a complex context, such as a project report or paper, and deliver a well organized public presentation. Their work reflects proper use of the language (Spanish or English), ability to handle the public, and answer questions related to their work.
Rubric for Outcome h:
The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal context
The goal of the assessment of this outcome is to measure the capability of students to discuss the social and environmental impact of engineering solutions. The environmental discussion may include protection of the environment, less harm criteria, and EPA regulations. The social discussion may include economic implications (such as entrepreneurship potential, sustainability, usability, and capital-labor issues) or social acceptance of the solution (such as comfort of usage, replacing of products, and protection of equipment from social habits, and public safety).
1Given a situation that involves an engineering solution, students poorly discuss the impact of the design on the environment or the social implications as stated in the header of this rubric.
2Given a situation that involves an engineering solution, students can discuss the impact of the design on the environment or the social implications as stated in the header of this rubric.
3Given a situation that involves an engineering solution, students can discuss the impact of the design on the environment and the social implications as stated in the header of this rubric.
4Students can discuss the impact of their design on the environment or the social implications as stated in the header of this rubric.
5Students can discuss the impact of their design on the environment and social implications as stated in the header of this rubric.
Rubric for Outcome i:
A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in lifelong learning
Relevant reference resources are cited or included in reports and presentations submitted as part of a project or other assignment.
1Reference efforts are limited to a web search or similar cursory effort.
2
3The information search includes library references, relevant material or information obtained through personal contact. Alternatively the student succeeded in finding specialized tools, software or hardware.
4
5The information developed satisfies the criteria above, and it is discussed, analyzed, and interpreted. Alternatively, students identified a tool and used it effectively.
Rubric for Outcome j:
Knowledge of contemporary issues
Contemporary issues may refer to political, economical issues, regulation changes, or emerging technologies that impact the engineering practice.
1Discuss a given contemporary issue.
2Student brings an article with a given contemporary issue.
3Students summarize an article of a given contemporary issue.
4Identify a contemporary issue by bringing a summary of an article.
5Identify and discuss a contemporary issue.
Rubric for Outcome k :
An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.
Students use specialized engineering tools, such as simulations, laboratory instruments, and graphical techniques:
1in assignments, or classroom work guided by the instructor.
2in assignments, or classroom work without help of the instructor.
3in addition to level 2, students analyze and validate the results.
4in design projects where the professor chooses, restricts, or helps in the selection of the tools. Students analyze and validate the results.
5in design projects where students make an appropriate choice of the tool. Students analyze and validate the results.

Student Outcomes

Rubrics fron 2014 to 2018